Sunday, March 30, 2014

Kombucha Tea


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I first used Kombucha Tea when it was first marketed at my local Wholefoods store about eight or nine years ago. Being on a low budget back then I decided to buy one of the “mushrooms (which is actually a fungus)” and ferment my own. It wasn’t hard to do and after a couple of batches I had the process down. You simply put the “mushroom” in distilled water and sugar and in a dark place for a week and you have a healthy batch with a new mushroom on top that looks like, well, a yellowish, slimy, pancake. But don’t let that that scare you, the tea itself tasted great! I used three herbal tea bags to give it my flavor of choice — Black Cherry Berry by Celestial Seasonings was my favorite. Like so many others have said, I felt more energy and over the year I drank it daily and was never sick. Unfortunately, I did get tired of the process and so stopped making my own tea but have continued to buy a bottle now and then from my health store because the taste is good, no fat, and it is a raw food. Also, I never had to use it to cure cancer or any other severe disease. It has been marketed as an elixir by some, which I wouldn’t discount but on the same note, can’t endorse. Others have said that kombucha softened their skin, helped with hair growth, and of course, cured cancer. Kombucha originated in Northeast China or Manchuria and later spread to Russia and from there to the rest of the world. In Russian, the kombucha culture is called chainyj grib чайный гриб (lit. “tea fungus/mushroom”), and the fermented drink is called chainyj grib, grib (“fungus; mushroom”), or chainyj kvas чайный квас (“tea kvass”). Kombucha was highly popular and seen as a health food in China in the 1950s and 1960s. Many families would grow kombucha at home. What I can say firsthand about kombucha is that I have been using it for over eight years now and my head hasn’t exploded nor has it caused me any uncontrollable twitches, or any other known side effect. Having said that, like anything else, you should start with a small doze over a few weeks to make sure your body doesn’t reject it, and also, as with any natural medicine, give it time. Remember, old remedies never worked as fast as our modern day miracle pills which lead to more miracle pills and money for such philanthropic corporations such as Pfizer. Also, as always, if you are sick, see a doctor.

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Sometimes







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 Sometimes I come across wonderful shorts that speak for themselves -- lost?  watch Seventh Seal.

Saturday, March 8, 2014

I Ain't Afraid of No Ghost

 People fear the spirit world and unfamiliar things such as ghosts, unexpected sounds and unexplained movements of objects. We have all heard stories of different encounters like the cold breeze that we feel across our neck when there are no windows opened in the house, or ghost-like apparitions either in photos or in person. Other episodes may include Ouija Board experiences when a planchett moves on its own and spells out a message or rocking chairs that rock with no one in them, along with numerous other unexplainable encounters. If these types of stories are true and ghosts do exist, should we fear them? Thousands of investigations and case studies of the paranormal show the exact opposite to what popular movies and books want us to believe and fear. Here are four reasons why people should not be afraid of ghosts:
 1. Paranormal investigations indicate that ghosts do not harm people.
 2. Individuals do not change personalities after death.
 3. Spirits of the dead are not vengeful.
 4. There has never been any documentation to show that ghosts hurt humans.
Most manifestations of unexplained activity that have surfaced from research noting demonic activities, have been linked not to ghosts, but to possible poltergeist activity. When people are attacked or objects are thrown by an unexplained force, it is usually believed to be that of a poltergeist which can be explained as the unconscious working of a living human who is subconsciously not at peace. We all have within us a spiritual aspect that very few of us really understand. Could it be that with enough pent up emotional energy a release occurs in an unexpected way such as a glass breaking on its own or objects mysteriously flying across the room?
People would do well to fear malicious humans over ghosts, as there is more evidence of people being hurtful and dangerous than ghosts. Perhaps people are afraid of what ghosts represent, and are afraid of the unknown.  Louanne welcomes you to discover real ghost stories, true paranormal activities, and spiritual encounters at http://GhostsnStuff.com Ghost Stories & Paranormal Activities. There you can read about chilling,  haunting and true ghost tales.                                                                                       

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

So, there I was dressed in my shorts when I felt this draft up my leg.  Was it a ghost?  You tell me.