Sunday, March 30, 2014

Kombucha Tea


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I first used Kombucha Tea when it was first marketed at my local Wholefoods store about eight or nine years ago. Being on a low budget back then I decided to buy one of the “mushrooms (which is actually a fungus)” and ferment my own. It wasn’t hard to do and after a couple of batches I had the process down. You simply put the “mushroom” in distilled water and sugar and in a dark place for a week and you have a healthy batch with a new mushroom on top that looks like, well, a yellowish, slimy, pancake. But don’t let that that scare you, the tea itself tasted great! I used three herbal tea bags to give it my flavor of choice — Black Cherry Berry by Celestial Seasonings was my favorite. Like so many others have said, I felt more energy and over the year I drank it daily and was never sick. Unfortunately, I did get tired of the process and so stopped making my own tea but have continued to buy a bottle now and then from my health store because the taste is good, no fat, and it is a raw food. Also, I never had to use it to cure cancer or any other severe disease. It has been marketed as an elixir by some, which I wouldn’t discount but on the same note, can’t endorse. Others have said that kombucha softened their skin, helped with hair growth, and of course, cured cancer. Kombucha originated in Northeast China or Manchuria and later spread to Russia and from there to the rest of the world. In Russian, the kombucha culture is called chainyj grib чайный гриб (lit. “tea fungus/mushroom”), and the fermented drink is called chainyj grib, grib (“fungus; mushroom”), or chainyj kvas чайный квас (“tea kvass”). Kombucha was highly popular and seen as a health food in China in the 1950s and 1960s. Many families would grow kombucha at home. What I can say firsthand about kombucha is that I have been using it for over eight years now and my head hasn’t exploded nor has it caused me any uncontrollable twitches, or any other known side effect. Having said that, like anything else, you should start with a small doze over a few weeks to make sure your body doesn’t reject it, and also, as with any natural medicine, give it time. Remember, old remedies never worked as fast as our modern day miracle pills which lead to more miracle pills and money for such philanthropic corporations such as Pfizer. Also, as always, if you are sick, see a doctor.

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